Visiting Tokyo can be pleasant during the day, but it is at nightfall that the capital is discovered. Its lights, its bars, its noises …

The number of tourists to Japan continues to increase and the trend should continue with the organization of the Rugby World Cup scheduled for 2019 as well as the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020.

In order to satisfy tourists, a survey was conducted among Tokyoites aged 20 to 30. They were asked where they would take a tourist for a drink to show him the “real” Tokyo.

Whether you’re a fan of beer, sake, or whiskey, Japan has a vibrant nightlife scene, and arguably the best way to experience the locals is to visit these low-key little alleys filled with bars and stalls.

10. Under the tracks of Koenji station

credit: tokyodeep.blogspot.fr

credit: tokyodeep.blogspot.fr

Many restaurants and bars can be found near the train stations. Koenji Station is no exception. Located on the Chuo JR Line, west of Tokyo, Koenji is home to many inexpensive bars and restaurants.

9. Ebisu Yokocho

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yoninja.com

Ebisu is not a district visited by many tourists during their stay in Tokyo but it would be shameful not to discover this place.

Located a few stations from Shibuya, Ebisu is home to many places to discover such as the Yebisu Beer Museum. You will also find many bars and restaurants there, enough to quench your thirst.

8. Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho

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Credit: ameblo.jp/eigazukinosyuukatu

Kichijoji is a trendy area of ​​Tokyo often frequented by students. As soon as night falls, the narrow streets, located in front of the north exit of the station, come to life and you will discover another facet of the district.

7. Ningyocho Amazake Yokocho

credit: ambassadors-japan.com

credit: ambassadors-japan.com

Ninyocho is famous for its mild sake (rice alcohol with little or no alcohol content) offered in the many bars and restaurants in the area. Even Japanese children can enjoy it! The atmosphere of the neighborhood is more traditional.

6. Shibuya Nonbei Yokocho

shibuya-nonbei-yokocho

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Not going to Shibuya when visiting Tokyo is a bit like visiting Paris without seeing the Eiffel Tower.

Ideal neighborhood forindulge in the practice of shopping, we advise you to move away from the busiest streets and head towards Nonbei Yokocho or “the alley of the drunkards”.

These small streets with a unique atmosphere are ideal for a pub crawl.

5. Asakusa Hoppi Dori

credit: travelwhereveryouwant.com

credit: travelwhereveryouwant.com

Asakusa is a very popular tourist spot. While most tourists go there to admire Kaminarimon, Sensoji Temple or check out the Nakamise Mall, few are familiar with the nightlife of the area.

Do not hesitate to complete your sightseeing tour by going for a drink or two in one of the bars in the area and discover the atmosphere of old Tokyo.

4. Shinbashi Yurakucho Gado-shita

The holy land of salarymen who flock here after work to participate in a “nomunication” [nomu (boire) + communication] with their colleagues.

A way to discover a moment that is an integral part of Japanese society and to make some fun contacts.

3. Shinjuku Omoide Yokocho

A district located in Shinjuku, better known by the unsavory nickname of “Piss Alley”. Do not pay attention, this place has a unique history as well as many bars and stalls.

2. Tsukishima Monja Street

credit: gaijingojapan.com

credit: gaijingojapan.com

If you like okonomiyaki then you should try Monjayaki. And the best place in Tokyo to try the experience is in Tsukishima. This giant cabbage pancake topped with various fillings, all cooked on a hot plate is a pure delight. The district has a street dedicated to the restaurants of Monjayaki. All you have to do is follow the scent.

1. Shinjuku Golden Gai

credit: japanesesearch.com

credit: japanesesearch.com

Probably the most famous place on the list. The narrow lanes east of Shinjuku Station will allow you to share a moment with locals or tourists in tiny bars, most of which can only accommodate a handful of people at a time.

Forget the glitz and glamor, in these bars dating from the Showa era, you will find mostly regulars, come for a few drinks after a hard day’s work.

Source: R25

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